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Oh man. I haven't been posting on this for ages as my short-attention… - The tissue of the Tears of Zorro [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
tearsofzorro

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[Aug. 31st, 2009|12:17 pm]
tearsofzorro
Oh man. I haven't been posting on this for ages as my short-attention quick-fire posts have since found a home in facebook.

But wow, am I overworked. That's probably a misnomer, but I have a lot of stuff to do. I suppose explaining how the workload is structured would make sense in explaining this.

We have what we test, and the programs we use to test it (call testsuites). When new versions of the testsuite come in, we might see new issues. Some of them are because the testsuite changed its behaviour when running tests, or there are new tests which fail. My job is to identify what's going wrong, and to update our list of known failures (called baselines). If a failure is known, we say "Ok, it's what we expect from our baseline, so we aren't concerned with this". So the next build of what we test doesn't show these up as problems. My job is also to get this done before the build closes. Also, whenever a problem comes up, we get a ticket, which basically says "It's your job to look after these failures", by which we mean analyse and report them, and baseline the fails.

What happened recently is, I got a new test version, and a whole load of new tests failed. So, now I have to figure out what tests failed and why. The problem is 3 builds came relatively quickly, and now I have about 60 tickets (we're only meant to have 10 open), and most of these are duplicates. Of course, I can lump tickets into 1, if they're the same problem, but first I have to make sure they're actually the same problem.

So yeah, lots of work. Oh, and I've to have the analysis done by today.

*Cries in a corner*
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